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randommomentsdevida:

ninjatengu:

mddiaries:

aspiringdoctors:

thisfuturemd:

Common Abbreviations in Medicine

YAY THIS IS GREAT! Also…- PRN= as needed
- BID = twice a day
- TID = three times a day
-hx or h/o = history of
- dc or d/c = discharge
- fu or f/u = follow-up
- CC = chief complaint or coco chanel ;)
Any others?

BIBEMS= brought in by EMSBIBA= brought in by ambulanceNTND= non-tender, non-distended TTP=tender to palpation RUQ, LUQ, RLQ, LLQ= right upper, left upper, right lower, left lower quadrant SOB=shortness of breath CP=chest painD/w= discussed withHTN=hypertension HLD=hyperlipidemiaT2DM= type 2 diabetes mellitusqH=every evening 2/2=secondary toAFVSS= afebrile, vital signs stableNS=normal saline

BRBPR: Bright red blood per rectum LAD: Lymphadenopathy CAD: coronary artery diseasePNA: Pneumonia BS: Bowel (or breath) sounds (as in Bowel sounds +) N/V: Nausea/vomiting AAO: Awake, alert, oriented A+O: Awake and orientedAKA: Above knee amputationBKA: Below knee amputation LMP: Last menstrual period KUB: kidney ureter bladderRRR: Regular rate & rhythm RTC: Return to clinicr/m/g: rales, murmurs, gallops (as in “no r/m/g”)also, I’ve seen tx used as transplant as well…

From what I understand, LAD can also be left axis deviation and something else that I can’t remember so I was basically told never to use it. n/v/d - nausea/vomiting/diarrheaLNMP - last normal menstrual periodAAA - abd aorta aneurysm A&Ox3 - alert and oriented x3CHF - congestive heart failureLLL, LUL, RLL, RUL, RML - left lower lobe, left upper lobe, right lower lobe, right upper lobe, right middle lobeLLE, RLE, BLE - left lower extremity, right lower extremity, bilat lower extremity LUE, RUE, BUE - left upper extremity, right upper extremity, bilat upper extremityCTA - clear to auscultationBP - blood pressure or back pain (but I hate when people use this for back pain) DM - diabetesIDDM - insulin dependent DMNIDDM - non-insulin dependent DMbx - biopsyBTL - bilateral tubal ligation f/c - fever, chillscxr - chest xray RBBB - right bundle branch blockLBBB - left bundle branch blockASA - aspirin fx - fractureFB - foreign body HA - headacheSI - suicidal ideationHI - homicidal ideation I&D - incision and drainageNAD - no acute distressEOM (EOMi) - extraocular muscles (extraocular muscles intact) PERRLA - pupils equal round and reactive to light accommodationPE - pulmonary embolism WNL - within nl limits (we never looked)  US - ultrasound# - pound (as in that baby weighs 5#, not 5 hashtag)yo - years old

randommomentsdevida:

ninjatengu:

mddiaries:

aspiringdoctors:

thisfuturemd:

Common Abbreviations in Medicine

YAY THIS IS GREAT! Also…
- PRN= as needed

- BID = twice a day

- TID = three times a day

-hx or h/o = history of

- dc or d/c = discharge

- fu or f/u = follow-up

- CC = chief complaint or coco chanel ;)

Any others?

BIBEMS= brought in by EMS
BIBA= brought in by ambulance
NTND= non-tender, non-distended
TTP=tender to palpation
RUQ, LUQ, RLQ, LLQ= right upper, left upper, right lower, left lower quadrant
SOB=shortness of breath
CP=chest pain
D/w= discussed with
HTN=hypertension
HLD=hyperlipidemia
T2DM= type 2 diabetes mellitus
qH=every evening
2/2=secondary to
AFVSS= afebrile, vital signs stable
NS=normal saline

BRBPR: Bright red blood per rectum 
LAD: Lymphadenopathy 
CAD: coronary artery disease
PNA: Pneumonia 
BS: Bowel (or breath) sounds (as in Bowel sounds +) 
N/V: Nausea/vomiting 
AAO: Awake, alert, oriented 
A+O: Awake and oriented
AKA: Above knee amputation
BKA: Below knee amputation 
LMP: Last menstrual period 
KUB: kidney ureter bladder
RRR: Regular rate & rhythm 
RTC: Return to clinic
r/m/g: rales, murmurs, gallops (as in “no r/m/g”)
also, I’ve seen tx used as transplant as well…

From what I understand, LAD can also be left axis deviation and something else that I can’t remember so I was basically told never to use it. 
n/v/d - nausea/vomiting/diarrhea
LNMP - last normal menstrual period
AAA - abd aorta aneurysm 
A&Ox3 - alert and oriented x3
CHF - congestive heart failure
LLL, LUL, RLL, RUL, RML - left lower lobe, left upper lobe, right lower lobe, right upper lobe, right middle lobe
LLE, RLE, BLE - left lower extremity, right lower extremity, bilat lower extremity 
LUE, RUE, BUE - left upper extremity, right upper extremity, bilat upper extremity
CTA - clear to auscultation
BP - blood pressure or back pain (but I hate when people use this for back pain
DM - diabetes
IDDM - insulin dependent DM
NIDDM - non-insulin dependent DM
bx - biopsy
BTL - bilateral tubal ligation 
f/c - fever, chills
cxr - chest xray 
RBBB - right bundle branch block
LBBB - left bundle branch block
ASA - aspirin 
fx - fracture
FB - foreign body 
HA - headache
SI - suicidal ideation
HI - homicidal ideation 
I&D - incision and drainage
NAD - no acute distress
EOM (EOMi) - extraocular muscles (extraocular muscles intact) 
PERRLA - pupils equal round and reactive to light accommodation
PE - pulmonary embolism
WNL - within nl limits (we never looked)  
US - ultrasound
# - pound (as in that baby weighs 5#, not 5 hashtag)
yo - years old

(Source: pinterest.com, via nurse-glow-worm)

*49

How I nurse after a successful mid-afternoon Starbucks run

nurse-alli:

nursingistheshit:

image

I wish with all my heart there was a Starbucks near my current job. Another reason. I. Need. To. Go.

dvasia:

This is a bull’s heart that we dissected today!The white, branching, stringy fibres here are the chordae tendineae, they attach to the papillary muscles within the left and right ventricle, which contract shortly before systole and tug on the chordae tendineae, which in turn pulls the heart valves closed to prevent a back-flow of blood in the heart.Also note how fucking thick the wall of the left ventricle/atrium is compared to the right, that’s a meaty ventricle - hot damn!

dvasia:

This is a bull’s heart that we dissected today!

The white, branching, stringy fibres here are the chordae tendineae, they attach to the papillary muscles within the left and right ventricle, which contract shortly before systole and tug on the chordae tendineae, which in turn pulls the heart valves closed to prevent a back-flow of blood in the heart.

Also note how fucking thick the wall of the left ventricle/atrium is compared to the right, that’s a meaty ventricle - hot damn!

*81

moshita:

Anatomy Studies

"Sculpting: The creation of this was done completely within Zbrush, aside from the cloth which was a MD sim. Using a sphere and dynamesh I started with the skull and then the jaw. Then, I started layering muscles on the face using the same method, using dynamesh and s sphere. I didn’t like how the muscles looked so detached from the bones and from each other, so everyone once in a while I would re-dynamesh everything together again - so in essence the skull and muscles of the face became one subtool that I could sculpt on. I sued the same methods with the sternum, clavicle and pec muscles. The veins and nerves were simply done zpheres, I tried other techniques as well but I felt I got the most accurate results with the zpheres…the most time consuming part was not the modeling but the reference hunting and checking, and re-checking over and over again to ensure I could get the most accurate results possible. Another positive side effect of this study was that I could tie it in with work and understanding FACS and how facial muscles work together. If people show interest I could upload this to gumroad and sell it for a small fee - IM me about this. Rendering: I rendered in Mental Ray for Maya. It was a pretty straight forward environment setup, I used curved ramp as backdrop and added some sidewalls to bounce light. I setup 4 lights - a couple rim lights a key and a fill. They were all area lights using light shape and a mental ray physical light shader, using the HSV value for intensity. For the camera I used a mia photographic lense and tweaked the settings along with light intensity until everything looked decent. A good tutorial for this is: http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showthr…th-mental-ray) Although the depth of field and Bokeh take FOREVER….so I usually skip that part and do it in photoshop. Once you understand that tutorial, you’ll understand how to customize and get the effects you are looking for.”

askutt

*6
forensicimagination:


“Something we don’t have a lot of on exhibit—I wish we did, and maybe we will in the future—is our historical photographs,” Dhody says. “Since the moment that photography was invented, it was used for medical purposes. Doctors immediately realized, ‘Hey, I can take pictures of my patients’ pathology so I can mail them to other doctors—I don’t have to cart the patient around or get the doctor to come to see the patient.’ The medical implications of photography were groundbreaking.” Among the photos in the collection is the one above. Though there’s no information written on the back, Dhody says that “judging by the way it’s kind of floppy like that, it makes more sense for it to be a uterine or ovarian cyst—something like that. It could be a tumor. It’s definitely something that’s not supposed to be there.” The photo below is a painting of the uterus of a pregnant cow, circa 1850.

(via 11 Things You Won’t See on Display at the Mütter Museum | Mental Floss)

forensicimagination:

“Something we don’t have a lot of on exhibit—I wish we did, and maybe we will in the future—is our historical photographs,” Dhody says. “Since the moment that photography was invented, it was used for medical purposes. Doctors immediately realized, ‘Hey, I can take pictures of my patients’ pathology so I can mail them to other doctors—I don’t have to cart the patient around or get the doctor to come to see the patient.’ The medical implications of photography were groundbreaking.” Among the photos in the collection is the one above. Though there’s no information written on the back, Dhody says that “judging by the way it’s kind of floppy like that, it makes more sense for it to be a uterine or ovarian cyst—something like that. It could be a tumor. It’s definitely something that’s not supposed to be there.” The photo below is a painting of the uterus of a pregnant cow, circa 1850.

(via 11 Things You Won’t See on Display at the Mütter Museum | Mental Floss)

magicmedic:

Pediatric IV sites

magicmedic:

Pediatric IV sites

(via nurse-glow-worm)

*87

(Source: facebook.com, via nightnursenotes)

metal-thimble:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

#this is dumb#but i’m desperate

metal-thimble:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

(Source: scarybilbo, via nightnursenotes)